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Our input still needed in law and order act

http://www.indiancountrytoday.com/opinion/editorials/Our-input-still-needed-in-Law-and-Order-Act-102101183.html

Our input still needed in Law and Order Act

Indian Country Today

Story Published: Sep 3, 2010

Story Updated: Sep 2, 2010

On July 29, President Barack Obama signed into law the Tribal Law and Order Act. The act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country. Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., made improving justice on reservations a high priority. Over a period of several years, congressional committees solicited the views of tribal communities, advocacy organizations, and tribal leaders. The unique needs and voices of tribal communities are clearly present in the TLOA.

The Tribal Law and Order Act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country.
 

Public safety efforts in tribal communities have long been underfunded and neglected. Tribal communities tend to be uncooperative with state and federal police, and tend to believe that tribal, state and federal courts do not provide fair decisions to tribal defendants or crime victims. Tribal communities continue to believe tribal, state and federal police have not provided enough public safety to tribal citizens. State and federal police and courts are seen as culturally unaware, while many tribal police and court arrangements are seen as too often influenced by tribal family and political relations. Overall, the state of justice in Indian country is poor. The TLOA is a welcome initiative to focus funds and attention on program improvements, and inter-agency police, court and detention cooperation.

The TLOA seeks to improve federal prosecutions for crimes committed on reservations, encourages cross-deputization of tribal police, access to criminal data, and supports more training in the areas of domestic and sexual violence. There are programs for addressing alcohol and drug issues, which are often associated with crime on reservations. Juveniles are provided with more treatment possibilities. The act lays the groundwork for strengthening tribal courts, tribal police and tribal detention facilities.

Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues.
 

Many tribal communities would like to administer their own courts, police and jails, but often don’t have enough resources, or feel they have government administration and organization for them to effectively carry out justice responsibilities. Tribal communities will need the funding and technical assistance offered by the TLOA. However, tribal communities need to believe that tribal, state and federal officers, courts and facilities will provide safe, fair and culturally aware treatment and serve the needs of tribal community members. The TLOA provides a good way toward technical assistance and funding, but the pathways to culturally acceptable and fair policing, courts and jails are not clearly outlined.

Much of the program planning for the TLOA are assigned to federal agencies such as the Department of Justice, the Department of Interior, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other agencies. Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.

The FBI, federal courts, and other federal justice agencies have not been great partners in providing safety and justice to Indian country. Tribal governments have concurrent jurisdiction over justice in both federal and Public Law 280 jurisdictions. Federal and county-state agencies need to form partnerships with tribal communities if tribal communities are ever going to see fairness, public safety and cultural sensitivity in the delivery of justice. Interagency, multi-jurisdictional agreements establish tribal government authority, and enable sharing of scarce resources, and allow tribal communities greater voice in the administration and change of agencies that affect justice on reservations.

Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.
 

The National Congress of American Indians is currently developing a network of organizations to comment and provide information and plans to federal agencies tasked with developing the programs and policies for implementing the TLOA. Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues. However, we look forward to the day when federal and state agencies will join with tribal communities, governments and other partners who are needed to craft and co-manage the provisions of the TLOA, and other such legislation, so they will work as intended in Indian country.

On July 29, President Barack Obama signed into law the Tribal Law and Order Act. The act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country. Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., made improving justice on reservations a high priority. Over a period of several years, congressional committees solicited the views of tribal communities, advocacy organizations, and tribal leaders. The unique needs and voices of tribal communities are clearly present in the TLOA.

The Tribal Law and Order Act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country.
 

Public safety efforts in tribal communities have long been underfunded and neglected. Tribal communities tend to be uncooperative with state and federal police, and tend to believe that tribal, state and federal courts do not provide fair decisions to tribal defendants or crime victims. Tribal communities continue to believe tribal, state and federal police have not provided enough public safety to tribal citizens. State and federal police and courts are seen as culturally unaware, while many tribal police and court arrangements are seen as too often influenced by tribal family and political relations. Overall, the state of justice in Indian country is poor. The TLOA is a welcome initiative to focus funds and attention on program improvements, and inter-agency police, court and detention cooperation.

The TLOA seeks to improve federal prosecutions for crimes committed on reservations, encourages cross-deputization of tribal police, access to criminal data, and supports more training in the areas of domestic and sexual violence. There are programs for addressing alcohol and drug issues, which are often associated with crime on reservations. Juveniles are provided with more treatment possibilities. The act lays the groundwork for strengthening tribal courts, tribal police and tribal detention facilities.

Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues.
 

Many tribal communities would like to administer their own courts, police and jails, but often don’t have enough resources, or feel they have government administration and organization for them to effectively carry out justice responsibilities. Tribal communities will need the funding and technical assistance offered by the TLOA. However, tribal communities need to believe that tribal, state and federal officers, courts and facilities will provide safe, fair and culturally aware treatment and serve the needs of tribal community members. The TLOA provides a good way toward technical assistance and funding, but the pathways to culturally acceptable and fair policing, courts and jails are not clearly outlined.

Much of the program planning for the TLOA are assigned to federal agencies such as the Department of Justice, the Department of Interior, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other agencies. Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.

The FBI, federal courts, and other federal justice agencies have not been great partners in providing safety and justice to Indian country. Tribal governments have concurrent jurisdiction over justice in both federal and Public Law 280 jurisdictions. Federal and county-state agencies need to form partnerships with tribal communities if tribal communities are ever going to see fairness, public safety and cultural sensitivity in the delivery of justice. Interagency, multi-jurisdictional agreements establish tribal government authority, and enable sharing of scarce resources, and allow tribal communities greater voice in the administration and change of agencies that affect justice on reservations.

Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.
 

The National Congress of American Indians is currently developing a network of organizations to comment and provide information and plans to federal agencies tasked with developing the programs and policies for implementing the TLOA. Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues. However, we look forward to the day when federal and state agencies will join with tribal communities, governments and other partners who are needed to craft and co-manage the provisions of the TLOA, and other such legislation, so they will work as intended in Indian country.

On July 29, President Barack Obama signed into law the Tribal Law and Order Act. The act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country. Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., made improving justice on reservations a high priority. Over a period of several years, congressional committees solicited the views of tribal communities, advocacy organizations, and tribal leaders. The unique needs and voices of tribal communities are clearly present in the TLOA.

The Tribal Law and Order Act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country.
 

Public safety efforts in tribal communities have long been underfunded and neglected. Tribal communities tend to be uncooperative with state and federal police, and tend to believe that tribal, state and federal courts do not provide fair decisions to tribal defendants or crime victims. Tribal communities continue to believe tribal, state and federal police have not provided enough public safety to tribal citizens. State and federal police and courts are seen as culturally unaware, while many tribal police and court arrangements are seen as too often influenced by tribal family and political relations. Overall, the state of justice in Indian country is poor. The TLOA is a welcome initiative to focus funds and attention on program improvements, and inter-agency police, court and detention cooperation.

The TLOA seeks to improve federal prosecutions for crimes committed on reservations, encourages cross-deputization of tribal police, access to criminal data, and supports more training in the areas of domestic and sexual violence. There are programs for addressing alcohol and drug issues, which are often associated with crime on reservations. Juveniles are provided with more treatment possibilities. The act lays the groundwork for strengthening tribal courts, tribal police and tribal detention facilities.

Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues.
 

Many tribal communities would like to administer their own courts, police and jails, but often don’t have enough resources, or feel they have government administration and organization for them to effectively carry out justice responsibilities. Tribal communities will need the funding and technical assistance offered by the TLOA. However, tribal communities need to believe that tribal, state and federal officers, courts and facilities will provide safe, fair and culturally aware treatment and serve the needs of tribal community members. The TLOA provides a good way toward technical assistance and funding, but the pathways to culturally acceptable and fair policing, courts and jails are not clearly outlined.

Much of the program planning for the TLOA are assigned to federal agencies such as the Department of Justice, the Department of Interior, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other agencies. Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.

The FBI, federal courts, and other federal justice agencies have not been great partners in providing safety and justice to Indian country. Tribal governments have concurrent jurisdiction over justice in both federal and Public Law 280 jurisdictions. Federal and county-state agencies need to form partnerships with tribal communities if tribal communities are ever going to see fairness, public safety and cultural sensitivity in the delivery of justice. Interagency, multi-jurisdictional agreements establish tribal government authority, and enable sharing of scarce resources, and allow tribal communities greater voice in the administration and change of agencies that affect justice on reservations.

Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.
 

The National Congress of American Indians is currently developing a network of organizations to comment and provide information and plans to federal agencies tasked with developing the programs and policies for implementing the TLOA. Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues. However, we look forward to the day when federal and state agencies will join with tribal communities, governments and other partners who are needed to craft and co-manage the provisions of the TLOA, and other such legislation, so they will work as intended in Indian country.

On July 29, President Barack Obama signed into law the Tribal Law and Order Act. The act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country. Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., made improving justice on reservations a high priority. Over a period of several years, congressional committees solicited the views of tribal communities, advocacy organizations, and tribal leaders. The unique needs and voices of tribal communities are clearly present in the TLOA.

The Tribal Law and Order Act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country.
 

Public safety efforts in tribal communities have long been underfunded and neglected. Tribal communities tend to be uncooperative with state and federal police, and tend to believe that tribal, state and federal courts do not provide fair decisions to tribal defendants or crime victims. Tribal communities continue to believe tribal, state and federal police have not provided enough public safety to tribal citizens. State and federal police and courts are seen as culturally unaware, while many tribal police and court arrangements are seen as too often influenced by tribal family and political relations. Overall, the state of justice in Indian country is poor. The TLOA is a welcome initiative to focus funds and attention on program improvements, and inter-agency police, court and detention cooperation.

The TLOA seeks to improve federal prosecutions for crimes committed on reservations, encourages cross-deputization of tribal police, access to criminal data, and supports more training in the areas of domestic and sexual violence. There are programs for addressing alcohol and drug issues, which are often associated with crime on reservations. Juveniles are provided with more treatment possibilities. The act lays the groundwork for strengthening tribal courts, tribal police and tribal detention facilities.

Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues.
 

Many tribal communities would like to administer their own courts, police and jails, but often don’t have enough resources, or feel they have government administration and organization for them to effectively carry out justice responsibilities. Tribal communities will need the funding and technical assistance offered by the TLOA. However, tribal communities need to believe that tribal, state and federal officers, courts and facilities will provide safe, fair and culturally aware treatment and serve the needs of tribal community members. The TLOA provides a good way toward technical assistance and funding, but the pathways to culturally acceptable and fair policing, courts and jails are not clearly outlined.

Much of the program planning for the TLOA are assigned to federal agencies such as the Department of Justice, the Department of Interior, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other agencies. Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.

The FBI, federal courts, and other federal justice agencies have not been great partners in providing safety and justice to Indian country. Tribal governments have concurrent jurisdiction over justice in both federal and Public Law 280 jurisdictions. Federal and county-state agencies need to form partnerships with tribal communities if tribal communities are ever going to see fairness, public safety and cultural sensitivity in the delivery of justice. Interagency, multi-jurisdictional agreements establish tribal government authority, and enable sharing of scarce resources, and allow tribal communities greater voice in the administration and change of agencies that affect justice on reservations.

Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.
 

The National Congress of American Indians is currently developing a network of organizations to comment and provide information and plans to federal agencies tasked with developing the programs and policies for implementing the TLOA. Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues. However, we look forward to the day when federal and state agencies will join with tribal communities, governments and other partners who are needed to craft and co-manage the provisions of the TLOA, and other such legislation, so they will work as intended in Indian country.

On July 29, President Barack Obama signed into law the Tribal Law and Order Act. The act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country. Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., made improving justice on reservations a high priority. Over a period of several years, congressional committees solicited the views of tribal communities, advocacy organizations, and tribal leaders. The unique needs and voices of tribal communities are clearly present in the TLOA.

The Tribal Law and Order Act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country.
 

Public safety efforts in tribal communities have long been underfunded and neglected. Tribal communities tend to be uncooperative with state and federal police, and tend to believe that tribal, state and federal courts do not provide fair decisions to tribal defendants or crime victims. Tribal communities continue to believe tribal, state and federal police have not provided enough public safety to tribal citizens. State and federal police and courts are seen as culturally unaware, while many tribal police and court arrangements are seen as too often influenced by tribal family and political relations. Overall, the state of justice in Indian country is poor. The TLOA is a welcome initiative to focus funds and attention on program improvements, and inter-agency police, court and detention cooperation.

The TLOA seeks to improve federal prosecutions for crimes committed on reservations, encourages cross-deputization of tribal police, access to criminal data, and supports more training in the areas of domestic and sexual violence. There are programs for addressing alcohol and drug issues, which are often associated with crime on reservations. Juveniles are provided with more treatment possibilities. The act lays the groundwork for strengthening tribal courts, tribal police and tribal detention facilities.

Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues.
 

Many tribal communities would like to administer their own courts, police and jails, but often don’t have enough resources, or feel they have government administration and organization for them to effectively carry out justice responsibilities. Tribal communities will need the funding and technical assistance offered by the TLOA. However, tribal communities need to believe that tribal, state and federal officers, courts and facilities will provide safe, fair and culturally aware treatment and serve the needs of tribal community members. The TLOA provides a good way toward technical assistance and funding, but the pathways to culturally acceptable and fair policing, courts and jails are not clearly outlined.

Much of the program planning for the TLOA are assigned to federal agencies such as the Department of Justice, the Department of Interior, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other agencies. Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.

The FBI, federal courts, and other federal justice agencies have not been great partners in providing safety and justice to Indian country. Tribal governments have concurrent jurisdiction over justice in both federal and Public Law 280 jurisdictions. Federal and county-state agencies need to form partnerships with tribal communities if tribal communities are ever going to see fairness, public safety and cultural sensitivity in the delivery of justice. Interagency, multi-jurisdictional agreements establish tribal government authority, and enable sharing of scarce resources, and allow tribal communities greater voice in the administration and change of agencies that affect justice on reservations.

Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.
 

The National Congress of American Indians is currently developing a network of organizations to comment and provide information and plans to federal agencies tasked with developing the programs and policies for implementing the TLOA. Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues. However, we look forward to the day when federal and state agencies will join with tribal communities, governments and other partners who are needed to craft and co-manage the provisions of the TLOA, and other such legislation, so they will work as intended in Indian country.

On July 29, President Barack Obama signed into law the Tribal Law and Order Act. The act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country. Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., made improving justice on reservations a high priority. Over a period of several years, congressional committees solicited the views of tribal communities, advocacy organizations, and tribal leaders. The unique needs and voices of tribal communities are clearly present in the TLOA.

The Tribal Law and Order Act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country.
 

Public safety efforts in tribal communities have long been underfunded and neglected. Tribal communities tend to be uncooperative with state and federal police, and tend to believe that tribal, state and federal courts do not provide fair decisions to tribal defendants or crime victims. Tribal communities continue to believe tribal, state and federal police have not provided enough public safety to tribal citizens. State and federal police and courts are seen as culturally unaware, while many tribal police and court arrangements are seen as too often influenced by tribal family and political relations. Overall, the state of justice in Indian country is poor. The TLOA is a welcome initiative to focus funds and attention on program improvements, and inter-agency police, court and detention cooperation.

The TLOA seeks to improve federal prosecutions for crimes committed on reservations, encourages cross-deputization of tribal police, access to criminal data, and supports more training in the areas of domestic and sexual violence. There are programs for addressing alcohol and drug issues, which are often associated with crime on reservations. Juveniles are provided with more treatment possibilities. The act lays the groundwork for strengthening tribal courts, tribal police and tribal detention facilities.

Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues.
 

Many tribal communities would like to administer their own courts, police and jails, but often don’t have enough resources, or feel they have government administration and organization for them to effectively carry out justice responsibilities. Tribal communities will need the funding and technical assistance offered by the TLOA. However, tribal communities need to believe that tribal, state and federal officers, courts and facilities will provide safe, fair and culturally aware treatment and serve the needs of tribal community members. The TLOA provides a good way toward technical assistance and funding, but the pathways to culturally acceptable and fair policing, courts and jails are not clearly outlined.

Much of the program planning for the TLOA are assigned to federal agencies such as the Department of Justice, the Department of Interior, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other agencies. Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.

The FBI, federal courts, and other federal justice agencies have not been great partners in providing safety and justice to Indian country. Tribal governments have concurrent jurisdiction over justice in both federal and Public Law 280 jurisdictions. Federal and county-state agencies need to form partnerships with tribal communities if tribal communities are ever going to see fairness, public safety and cultural sensitivity in the delivery of justice. Interagency, multi-jurisdictional agreements establish tribal government authority, and enable sharing of scarce resources, and allow tribal communities greater voice in the administration and change of agencies that affect justice on reservations.

Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.
 

The National Congress of American Indians is currently developing a network of organizations to comment and provide information and plans to federal agencies tasked with developing the programs and policies for implementing the TLOA. Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues. However, we look forward to the day when federal and state agencies will join with tribal communities, governments and other partners who are needed to craft and co-manage the provisions of the TLOA, and other such legislation, so they will work as intended in Indian country.

On July 29, President Barack Obama signed into law the Tribal Law and Order Act. The act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country. Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., made improving justice on reservations a high priority. Over a period of several years, congressional committees solicited the views of tribal communities, advocacy organizations, and tribal leaders. The unique needs and voices of tribal communities are clearly present in the TLOA.

The Tribal Law and Order Act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country.
 

Public safety efforts in tribal communities have long been underfunded and neglected. Tribal communities tend to be uncooperative with state and federal police, and tend to believe that tribal, state and federal courts do not provide fair decisions to tribal defendants or crime victims. Tribal communities continue to believe tribal, state and federal police have not provided enough public safety to tribal citizens. State and federal police and courts are seen as culturally unaware, while many tribal police and court arrangements are seen as too often influenced by tribal family and political relations. Overall, the state of justice in Indian country is poor. The TLOA is a welcome initiative to focus funds and attention on program improvements, and inter-agency police, court and detention cooperation.

The TLOA seeks to improve federal prosecutions for crimes committed on reservations, encourages cross-deputization of tribal police, access to criminal data, and supports more training in the areas of domestic and sexual violence. There are programs for addressing alcohol and drug issues, which are often associated with crime on reservations. Juveniles are provided with more treatment possibilities. The act lays the groundwork for strengthening tribal courts, tribal police and tribal detention facilities.

Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues.
 

Many tribal communities would like to administer their own courts, police and jails, but often don’t have enough resources, or feel they have government administration and organization for them to effectively carry out justice responsibilities. Tribal communities will need the funding and technical assistance offered by the TLOA. However, tribal communities need to believe that tribal, state and federal officers, courts and facilities will provide safe, fair and culturally aware treatment and serve the needs of tribal community members. The TLOA provides a good way toward technical assistance and funding, but the pathways to culturally acceptable and fair policing, courts and jails are not clearly outlined.

Much of the program planning for the TLOA are assigned to federal agencies such as the Department of Justice, the Department of Interior, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other agencies. Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.

The FBI, federal courts, and other federal justice agencies have not been great partners in providing safety and justice to Indian country. Tribal governments have concurrent jurisdiction over justice in both federal and Public Law 280 jurisdictions. Federal and county-state agencies need to form partnerships with tribal communities if tribal communities are ever going to see fairness, public safety and cultural sensitivity in the delivery of justice. Interagency, multi-jurisdictional agreements establish tribal government authority, and enable sharing of scarce resources, and allow tribal communities greater voice in the administration and change of agencies that affect justice on reservations.

Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.
 

The National Congress of American Indians is currently developing a network of organizations to comment and provide information and plans to federal agencies tasked with developing the programs and policies for implementing the TLOA. Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues. However, we look forward to the day when federal and state agencies will join with tribal communities, governments and other partners who are needed to craft and co-manage the provisions of the TLOA, and other such legislation, so they will work as intended in Indian country.

On July 29, President Barack Obama signed into law the Tribal Law and Order Act. The act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country. Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., made improving justice on reservations a high priority. Over a period of several years, congressional committees solicited the views of tribal communities, advocacy organizations, and tribal leaders. The unique needs and voices of tribal communities are clearly present in the TLOA.

The Tribal Law and Order Act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country.
 

Public safety efforts in tribal communities have long been underfunded and neglected. Tribal communities tend to be uncooperative with state and federal police, and tend to believe that tribal, state and federal courts do not provide fair decisions to tribal defendants or crime victims. Tribal communities continue to believe tribal, state and federal police have not provided enough public safety to tribal citizens. State and federal police and courts are seen as culturally unaware, while many tribal police and court arrangements are seen as too often influenced by tribal family and political relations. Overall, the state of justice in Indian country is poor. The TLOA is a welcome initiative to focus funds and attention on program improvements, and inter-agency police, court and detention cooperation.

The TLOA seeks to improve federal prosecutions for crimes committed on reservations, encourages cross-deputization of tribal police, access to criminal data, and supports more training in the areas of domestic and sexual violence. There are programs for addressing alcohol and drug issues, which are often associated with crime on reservations. Juveniles are provided with more treatment possibilities. The act lays the groundwork for strengthening tribal courts, tribal police and tribal detention facilities.

Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues.
 

Many tribal communities would like to administer their own courts, police and jails, but often don’t have enough resources, or feel they have government administration and organization for them to effectively carry out justice responsibilities. Tribal communities will need the funding and technical assistance offered by the TLOA. However, tribal communities need to believe that tribal, state and federal officers, courts and facilities will provide safe, fair and culturally aware treatment and serve the needs of tribal community members. The TLOA provides a good way toward technical assistance and funding, but the pathways to culturally acceptable and fair policing, courts and jails are not clearly outlined.

Much of the program planning for the TLOA are assigned to federal agencies such as the Department of Justice, the Department of Interior, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other agencies. Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.

The FBI, federal courts, and other federal justice agencies have not been great partners in providing safety and justice to Indian country. Tribal governments have concurrent jurisdiction over justice in both federal and Public Law 280 jurisdictions. Federal and county-state agencies need to form partnerships with tribal communities if tribal communities are ever going to see fairness, public safety and cultural sensitivity in the delivery of justice. Interagency, multi-jurisdictional agreements establish tribal government authority, and enable sharing of scarce resources, and allow tribal communities greater voice in the administration and change of agencies that affect justice on reservations.

Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.
 

The National Congress of American Indians is currently developing a network of organizations to comment and provide information and plans to federal agencies tasked with developing the programs and policies for implementing the TLOA. Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues. However, we look forward to the day when federal and state agencies will join with tribal communities, governments and other partners who are needed to craft and co-manage the provisions of the TLOA, and other such legislation, so they will work as intended in Indian country.

On July 29, President Barack Obama signed into law the Tribal Law and Order Act. The act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country. Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., made improving justice on reservations a high priority. Over a period of several years, congressional committees solicited the views of tribal communities, advocacy organizations, and tribal leaders. The unique needs and voices of tribal communities are clearly present in the TLOA.

The Tribal Law and Order Act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country.
 

Public safety efforts in tribal communities have long been underfunded and neglected. Tribal communities tend to be uncooperative with state and federal police, and tend to believe that tribal, state and federal courts do not provide fair decisions to tribal defendants or crime victims. Tribal communities continue to believe tribal, state and federal police have not provided enough public safety to tribal citizens. State and federal police and courts are seen as culturally unaware, while many tribal police and court arrangements are seen as too often influenced by tribal family and political relations. Overall, the state of justice in Indian country is poor. The TLOA is a welcome initiative to focus funds and attention on program improvements, and inter-agency police, court and detention cooperation.

The TLOA seeks to improve federal prosecutions for crimes committed on reservations, encourages cross-deputization of tribal police, access to criminal data, and supports more training in the areas of domestic and sexual violence. There are programs for addressing alcohol and drug issues, which are often associated with crime on reservations. Juveniles are provided with more treatment possibilities. The act lays the groundwork for strengthening tribal courts, tribal police and tribal detention facilities.

Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues.
 

Many tribal communities would like to administer their own courts, police and jails, but often don’t have enough resources, or feel they have government administration and organization for them to effectively carry out justice responsibilities. Tribal communities will need the funding and technical assistance offered by the TLOA. However, tribal communities need to believe that tribal, state and federal officers, courts and facilities will provide safe, fair and culturally aware treatment and serve the needs of tribal community members. The TLOA provides a good way toward technical assistance and funding, but the pathways to culturally acceptable and fair policing, courts and jails are not clearly outlined.

Much of the program planning for the TLOA are assigned to federal agencies such as the Department of Justice, the Department of Interior, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other agencies. Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.

The FBI, federal courts, and other federal justice agencies have not been great partners in providing safety and justice to Indian country. Tribal governments have concurrent jurisdiction over justice in both federal and Public Law 280 jurisdictions. Federal and county-state agencies need to form partnerships with tribal communities if tribal communities are ever going to see fairness, public safety and cultural sensitivity in the delivery of justice. Interagency, multi-jurisdictional agreements establish tribal government authority, and enable sharing of scarce resources, and allow tribal communities greater voice in the administration and change of agencies that affect justice on reservations.

Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.
 

The National Congress of American Indians is currently developing a network of organizations to comment and provide information and plans to federal agencies tasked with developing the programs and policies for implementing the TLOA. Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues. However, we look forward to the day when federal and state agencies will join with tribal communities, governments and other partners who are needed to craft and co-manage the provisions of the TLOA, and other such legislation, so they will work as intended in Indian country.

On July 29, President Barack Obama signed into law the Tribal Law and Order Act. The act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country. Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., made improving justice on reservations a high priority. Over a period of several years, congressional committees solicited the views of tribal communities, advocacy organizations, and tribal leaders. The unique needs and voices of tribal communities are clearly present in the TLOA.

The Tribal Law and Order Act is a comprehensive piece of legislation that covers a wide range of pressing justice issues in Indian country.
 

Public safety efforts in tribal communities have long been underfunded and neglected. Tribal communities tend to be uncooperative with state and federal police, and tend to believe that tribal, state and federal courts do not provide fair decisions to tribal defendants or crime victims. Tribal communities continue to believe tribal, state and federal police have not provided enough public safety to tribal citizens. State and federal police and courts are seen as culturally unaware, while many tribal police and court arrangements are seen as too often influenced by tribal family and political relations. Overall, the state of justice in Indian country is poor. The TLOA is a welcome initiative to focus funds and attention on program improvements, and inter-agency police, court and detention cooperation.

The TLOA seeks to improve federal prosecutions for crimes committed on reservations, encourages cross-deputization of tribal police, access to criminal data, and supports more training in the areas of domestic and sexual violence. There are programs for addressing alcohol and drug issues, which are often associated with crime on reservations. Juveniles are provided with more treatment possibilities. The act lays the groundwork for strengthening tribal courts, tribal police and tribal detention facilities.

Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues.
 

Many tribal communities would like to administer their own courts, police and jails, but often don’t have enough resources, or feel they have government administration and organization for them to effectively carry out justice responsibilities. Tribal communities will need the funding and technical assistance offered by the TLOA. However, tribal communities need to believe that tribal, state and federal officers, courts and facilities will provide safe, fair and culturally aware treatment and serve the needs of tribal community members. The TLOA provides a good way toward technical assistance and funding, but the pathways to culturally acceptable and fair policing, courts and jails are not clearly outlined.

Much of the program planning for the TLOA are assigned to federal agencies such as the Department of Justice, the Department of Interior, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other agencies. Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.

The FBI, federal courts, and other federal justice agencies have not been great partners in providing safety and justice to Indian country. Tribal governments have concurrent jurisdiction over justice in both federal and Public Law 280 jurisdictions. Federal and county-state agencies need to form partnerships with tribal communities if tribal communities are ever going to see fairness, public safety and cultural sensitivity in the delivery of justice. Interagency, multi-jurisdictional agreements establish tribal government authority, and enable sharing of scarce resources, and allow tribal communities greater voice in the administration and change of agencies that affect justice on reservations.

Much of the impact of the TLOA will be lost in bureaucratic regulations and administration if tribal communities and leaders do not have significant voice in the planning and organization of justice programs.
 

The National Congress of American Indians is currently developing a network of organizations to comment and provide information and plans to federal agencies tasked with developing the programs and policies for implementing the TLOA. Tribal members should participate in addressing the very important TLOA implementation issues. However, we look forward to the day when federal and state agencies will join with tribal communities, governments and other partners who are needed to craft and co-manage the provisions of the TLOA, and other such legislation, so they will work as intended in Indian country.

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